Tuesday, February 22, 2011

An Honest Speech of a King with Real Grit

The King's Speech
Synopsis: As the world begins to transition into the age of technology, figureheads are no longer just known names, but voices on the radio. Bertie (Colin Firth) is the Duke of York, second in line for the role as the king. He is hindered by a stammer that his wife tries hard to help him overcome. When his brother's infidelity leads him to be unfit to be king, Bertie reluctantly takes the crown and dons the name King George. With a bit of trepidation, he gains the responsibility of leading his country. As the world faces the next world war, Bertie needs to become more than just king, but hope for the nation. To do so, he must overcome his stammer and deliver speeches to his country over the radio.

With the help of an unusual speech therapist named Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush) and the encouragement of his wife (Helena Bonham Carter), Bertie learns to overcome more than just his stammer in order to deliver motivational speeches that will help lead the country through war.
Review: This movie is absolutely beautiful. The story is heart-wrenching and motivational, and displayed in a well made film. I don't cry often while watching movies, but this film sent a few tears teetering in the corners of my eyes. But it also provided several humorous moments that called for out loud laughs. The acting is phenomenal, especially Colin Firth's portrayal of the king. His raw emotion emanates off the screen. Though it is overall slow paced, it is easy to be drawn into the film and to feel like you exist alongside the characters.  
Nominations:
Best Picture
Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth
Actor in a Supporting Role: Geoffrey Rush
Actress in a Supporting Role: Helena Bonham Carter
Art Direction
Cinematography
Costume Design
Directing: Tom Hooper
Film Editing
Music (Original Score): Alexandre Desplat
Sound Mixing
Writing (original screenplay)
Predictions:
Actor in a Leading Role: Colin Firth did an amazing job and I absolutely think he deserves the win. This is probably the only award I can really take an accurate guess, though it deserves to win many more.

True Grit 

Synopsis: This is the gritty tale of fourteen-year-old Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld), who sets off on the hunt to avenge her father's death. She hires a Marshall (Bridges) to help her track down her father's killer so she can put a bullet in his head. The Marshall reluctantly helps her and along the way they meet another lawman (Matt Damon). The trio makes their way into Indian territory encountering some interesting characters and chasing after retribution. 
Review: Though this is not my ideal type of film, I still found it mildly enjoyable. I would say that it is well made and very well acted. Hailee Steinfeld does an amazing job as young Mattie and I think she deserved to be nominated for best actress and not just supporting. Her sass carries the film and I would say overall she is the character with the most grit. Matt Damon was also very entertaining in this movie, possessing an attractive charm. 
Nominations:
Best Picture
Actor in a Leading Role: Jeff Bridges
Actress in a Supporting Role: Hailee Steinfeld
Art Direction
Cinematography
Costume Design
Directing: Joel and Ethan Coen
Sound Editing
Sound Mixing
Writing (Adapted Screenplay)
Predictions:
This movie is good and deserves its nominations, but I would not say it deserves any wins. Though that is merely personal opinion and not scientific fact. 

Tomorrow: Winter's Bone and 127 Hours

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